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CIIC 69. Ahalisky I, Co. Cork

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© 2014-04-08

National Monuments Service Record Number: CO122-049003-

Site Type

Souterrain

Description

Site

The souterrain (CO122-049002-) is located in the northern half of one (CO122-049001-) of six known ringforts in the townland, at least three of which contain souterrains. Brash (1879, 145-8) describes earth-cut chambers and passages with a stone-built entrance passage (L 3.9m; W 1.2m; max. H 1m) roofed with seven lintels. Ogham inscriptions were found on two lintels and a support stone near the entrance.

Monument

1 of 3 Ogam stones re-used in the construction of a souterrain - 'fourth out of the seven roofing-slabs on the cave' counting from the entrance. Clay slate, 1.35m x 0.36m x 0.34m (converted from Macalister 1945, 73).

Text

Inscribed on one angle, up. 'The inscription is cut in fine scores on the dexter angle... The notches of the final I are rather long, and misled early decipherers into the letter as Q. Brash makes the A into an O but there is only one notch' (Macalister 1945, 73). The scores are so fine that they appear to have been made by a saw-like implement, with breaks in the scores where the stone is uneven.

Transliteration

GIRAGNI

Translation

'of Gerrán'

Commentary

  • This is one of the inscriptions listed by McManus (1991, 93-4) to be among the earliest in the corpus showing no trace of vowel affection. It may be dated to the first half, or the early second half, of the fifth century (McManus1991, 97).

  • ?Gerr 'short (-haired?)' and diminutive suffix -agni (>-an(n), Gerrán), cf. CIIC 119 Monataggart II: DALAGNI (>Dallán) (McManus1991, 107).

Locations

Found

One of seven lintels in a souterrain in the townland of Ahalisky, barony of East Carbery. The original location of this stone may be accessed via the National Monuments Service Historic Environment viewer on www.archaeology.ie. (GPS coordinates -8.847020, 51.681206)

Original

Unknown

Last recorded

National Museum of Ireland (NMI Ref. 1927:1), Dublin. The present location of this stone may be accessed via the National Monuments Service Historic Environment viewer on www.archaeology.ie. (GPS coordinates -6.254558,53.340408)

History of Recording

Discovered in 1841 by Zachariah Hawkes of Monees and (J.) Windele (Brash 1879, 145). All three stones were 'taken out of the cave sometime toward the end of the nineteenth century, by the proprietor, the late Mr. R. Bence Jones, and placed on a rockery in his garden: but afterwards acquired from him by the Royal Irish Academy' (Macalister 1945, 73).

References

Websites and Online Databases

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